The Octagon

Young People & Children

Theory & Model

The Octagon is a safe, non-judgmental place for children and teenagers to express themselves verbally or creatively, allowing them to bring what they need to their session.  There are many imaginative therapeutic choices made available. I use the sand tray, puppetry, journal writing, artwork, memory boxes and games to help those who might prefer using creative tools to work through their emotional struggles or difficulties.

As a counsellor who specialises working with children and teenagers I have developed a holistic, person centred, integrative approach which enables me to draw upon a variety of recognised theories allowing me to adapt the way I work to best fit the needs of my clients, giving them space to explore.

It may be that a more directive approach is requested or that CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy), once experienced, becomes a preferred client choice. Whatever the need, I recognise that each person’s story is unique and therefore their therapy should reflect their individual needs.

Helping With
School Problems

Issues and areas of focus that commonly arise include:

  • Friendships
  • Family problems
  • Parents’ relationships (e.g. divorce)
  • Problems caused by alcohol, drugs or gambling
  • Money 
  • Body image or self-esteem
  • Feeling unsafe or uncomfortable
  • Depressed
  • Afraid of being hurt
  • Feeling angry
  • Worried about your feelings
  • Puberty
  • Thinking errors
  • Concentration

Teenagers & Adolescents

Helping to make sense of feelings, thoughts and behaviours, such as:

  • Feeling sad all or most of the time
  • Feeling anxious
  • Relationships
  • Exams
  • Bullying
  • Stress
  • Sexual identity
  • Trauma
  • Personal development
  • Traumatic bereavement
  • Peer pressure
  • Independence
  • Feeling isolated
  • Concerns around drug and alcohol use
  • Communication with parents.

This forms an essential part of the work as what is discussed in the counselling rooms is not discussed with parents/carers or schools. However, there are exceptions to this rule and depending upon any concerns about the safety of the child.

As a counsellor who specialises working with children and teenagers I have developed a holistic, person centred, integrative approach which enables me to draw upon a variety of recognised theories allowing me to adapt the way I work to best fit the needs of my clients, giving them space to explore.

It may be that a more directive approach is requested or that CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy), once experienced, becomes a preferred client choice. Whatever the need, I recognise that each person’s story is unique and therefore their therapy should reflect their individual needs.

The children’s act (1989): states counsellors are required to report any child protection concerns.